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Deer Fence

Deer Fencing in Seminole County

It’s easy to become excited when seeing a deer in your yard, but that excitement can quickly turn to frustration once you find that those deer have begun to eat your plants. Whether they’re a fruit, vegetables, or just landscaping plants, no gardener wants to see their hard work munched away in one afternoon.

Even if you have no plants to protect from deer, you may still want to keep them off of your property. Deer carry ticks and will drop them in your yard. Ticks may then attach to you or your pets, and carry sicknesses such as Lyme disease. Keeping deer out of a yard has been proven to cut back on the number of ticks in a yard.

There are a few ways to deter deer from your yard. You can try deer repellant sprays, plant more deer-resistant plants, or even remove your plants all together- although this is not usually an attractive option.

Or, you can build a deer fence. A deer fence is used to fence in small areas such as gardens and yard to protect them from deer. There are a few different kinds of fences to choose from, but they have the same basic necessities; deer fences need to be almost invisible, tall, and sturdy.

A standard deer fence is at least 7 feet tall, although deer have been known to jump up to 8 feet in the air. The fence must be as invisible as possible, this is to prevent deer from seeing and jumping over it. An effective deer fence has no top rail so there is nothing for the deer to see. The fence must also be sturdy. Deer and other wildlife will run into the fenceline when trying to enter the fenced-off area, the fence must be able to withstand being bumped/ran into. All mesh used in deer fencing, regardless of the materials chosen, should have openings no greater than 2”. Larger openings leave the possibility of wildlife getting caught in the fence, resulting in unnecessary deaths and possible fence damage.

Types of Deer Fence

There are a few different options for deer fencing, although some options may be better than others.

Polypropylene mesh fence: Is less expensive than metal mesh and is nearly invisible, but is it not as durable.

Metal mesh fence: More durable than polypropylene, but is more expensive. The less expensive versions are not invisible.

Alternative Deer Fences

Electric fence: Electric fencing is not recommended for deer fencing. Electric fences work best with animals who can be trained or learn to stay away from the fence, such as livestock or pets. Deer are wild animals, and will not learn or understand the fence. Electric fences also require more upkeep and can be shorted-out if something as simple as a branch falls onto the line.

Privacy fence: In some cases, a privacy fence is used to keep deer out of yards. This is usually used in more residential areas but is still efficient. Deer cannot see through a privacy fence to see if there are predators on the other side, so they will likely not jump over the barrier. Privacy fences, however, are much more expensive than standard deer fences and their installation is more tedious.

A deer fence doesn't have to hide your yard- most fences are nearly invisible from 20 feet away, allowing your landscaping to show through.

Regardless of the fence material chosen, it will still be necessary to routinely check the fence line for damage so that it can be repaired. Installing the deer fence is relatively simple and can be completed by most homeowners. Posts do not need to be installed deep into the ground like traditional fence posts. In fact, many times metal poles are used for a deer fence. They are sturdy and do not need to be dug into the ground, they can simply be driven into the dirt by hitting them with a mallet or hammer. The mesh is then installed by attaching to the posts using zip ties to pull it taught. Use bottom ground stakes to hold the fence down to the ground so that deer and other wildlife cannot crawl under. If you’re a little handier, you can craft a gate, or simply leave an area of overlapping mesh that you can open and re-close for easy access to the fenced-in area.

Once the fence is installed, spray the ground level around it with deer repellant and enjoy your deer-free oasis.

High-Tensile Wire Agricultural Fence

The State of Florida does not require livestock owners to fence in their properties, but livestock is not allowed to wander onto public roads or onto private properties. If this happens, the livestock owner is liable for any damages their animals caused. Because of this, most agricultural land and livestock owners have fenced in their properties. But fencing in or repairing a fence on a large piece of property is an extensive – and expensive – task. Many landowners find themselves wondering if fencing is worth the cost and the trouble. But without agricultural or field fencing, livestock can still wander off, and predators can still get in.

So how can agricultural landowners in Central Florida protect their property and livestock? The answer comes in many forms, but today we will be focusing on one: High Tensile Wire Fencing.

High-Tensile Wire Fencing

High tensile wire fence is a semi-new fence style that came out of New Zealand. This fence style utilizes a smooth 12 ½ gauge wire stretched tightly between fence posts, up to 250 pounds of tension on the wires.  High tensile wire fences are now being seen as a good alternative to barbed wire agricultural fencing, as it is easier to handle/install, there are no barbs to harm livestock or wildlife, is lower maintenance with longer life (up to 40 years), can easily be electrified, and is less expensive to install.

This unique wire fence can be electrified – just the top or bottom wire for instance – to help keep predators such as coyotes or fox out of livestock fields. The wires are also smooth, allowing for wildlife to slip in or out if needed. It’s very common for deer or even livestock to get stuck in wired fences, or snared by barbed wire.

To prevent this, install the wires to your fence where the livestock can’t slip through, but keep it wildlife-friendly. The top two wires should be 12 inches apart, while the bottom wire should have 16 inches of clearance above the ground. The fence should be no taller than 42 inches tall, short enough for wildlife to escape by jumping over if necessary. The top wire should be marked in some way for visibility- this is important for both wildlife and livestock. Visibility can be achieved by using a top rail when installing the fence, using flags, or running the wire through PVC piping. A wire fence that is not visible is susceptible to having animals caught in it, a potential for fence damage and life-threatening injuries for the animals.

High tensile wire fence marked with PVC pipes

High tensile wire fence with a top rail for visibility

High tensile wire fence with a top rail for visibility

High tensile wire fence with visibility flags

High tensile fencing is proven to be just as efficient and more environmentally friendly than the average mesh metal wire field fence. These fences are dangerous to livestock and wildlife as well. Animals that get caught in a fence line may pull down sections of fence, allowing for livestock to escape their fenced-in land or allowing predators to easily get into their enclosure. The wire mesh fencing can cause serious injuries to animals, including broken limbs or death.

Sheep caught in wire mesh fence

Baby deer stuck in wire mesh fence

Overall, high tensile wire fencing seems to be the most fitting option in many cases for environmentally-conscious livestock owners. It’s reliability, strength, and low-maintenance installation makes it a favorable option for Central Florida. Paramount Fencing does recommend using pressure-treated pine posts for the installation, as well as not using concrete on the install to extend the life of your fence.

If high tensile fencing does not look like what you need, remember to consider your other options, and to call Paramount Fencing for a free fence estimate.

TO SCHEDULE A FREE ESTIMATE CALL! (407) 341-2720 Family Owned & Operated Since 2003 Veteran Owned and Operated.

Types of Field Fences

Wood Horse Fence

Wood is the most common option for horse fences. It is sturdy, cost efficient, and has the rustic appearance that many land owners look for. It is a good choice for a horse fence material, but make sure to take into consideration all options.

Wood fencing, over time, can shrink, warp, discolor, and need minor routine maintenance.  That does not sound like a huge issue, but having to repair a mile of fencing can be a big job. Wood fencing is recommended to be painted to help horses see it, as they are both far-sighted and may not see well at night. A horse plowing into a fence can damage the fence, and harm the horse. Keeping the paint maintained can also be a task.

Wood is sturdy, but ensure that the correct posts are being used to anchor the fence into the ground. For wood fencing, Custom Fence Oviedo does not recommend anchoring with concrete, as concrete holds moisture and will actually speed up the process of post rot. The key to post installation is to have leverage over the above ground section. For example, a 6' tall fence will use 4" x 4" x 10' line posts to provide the correct leverage ratio.

For a horse fence, it's ideal to use a mesh wiring to help prevent the horse to step through the fence. A 2" x 4" wire is best for horses, as it prevents them from stepping through or getting caught in it. Horses are much more likely to fight in a situation where they're stuck than other livestock, and their thinner skin than livestock can make getting stuck in wire a life-threatening situation for them. It is also recommended to use a "no climb" wire mesh, that has openings that are too small for the horse to step up on.

Regardless of material, it is important to understand the height requirements and number of boards necessary to property house a horse. For young horses, the fence should be a minimum for 4.5 feet tall, and be a 3-rail to help prevent the horse from stepping through. Adult horses will require a height of 5 to 6 feet tall and be a 4 or 5 rail to help discourage the horse from jumping or leaning over. Pairing the correct heights, rail numbers, and wiring will assist in choosing the safest and most efficient fence for your horse.

Aluminum and Vinyl Horse Fence

Other options for horse fencing materials include both aluminum and vinyl.

Aluminum

Aluminum is not often seen, but is ideal if building between concrete columns. It is recommended for use in the fronts of properties for aesthetic purposes, or for businesses such as equestrian centers or stable rentals. Custom Fence Oviedo recommends Alumi-Guard aluminum products. Aluminum horse fences have an expensive upfront cost, but require less maintenance than other materials. They are available in 7 different powder-coated long lasting colors.

Aluminum horse fences are available in 2, 3, and 4-rail options and in 8-foot wide sections.

 

Vinyl

Vinyl horse fence has a moderate upfront cost, and is a great option for both horse fences and decorative field fences. Vinyl fencing is a plastic polymer, which helps give the fence a bit of flexibility if a horse were to lean against it. Custom Fence Oviedo recommends Homeland Vinyl products, which are high quality vinyl products containing titanium dioxide as a UV inhibitor. The pigments used in their colored products also contain UV protectants. This is ideal for land owners who want their white fence to stay white without much work.

Although less work than wood, vinyl horse fences are not as strong. The posts and rails are hollow, meaning they may crack if a horse were to lean too hard, or run into the fence.

Vinyl horse fences are available in 2, 3, 4, and 5-rail options and in 8-foot wide sections.

 

 

Field Fence

Field fence, sometimes called deer fence, is another option.

 

If your goal is to keep something in or out of your property, including both livestock or predators, the most cost effective option for your needs may be field fencing. Field fencing in constructed of wooden line posts and mesh wire (oftentimes "no-climb wire). They may feature a wood top rail, depending on the purpose of the fence.

Field Fence is often used around gardens or fields to keep grazing deer out, or as a simple barrier for grazing livestock such as sheep, goats, and cattle.

Wired Field fence is an affordable and effective way to fence in a property. It is available up to six foot in height and can be customized to fit both you and your property's specific needs.

 

Barbed Wire Fence

Barbed wire fencing was the first fencing type found to be able to restrain cattle, and began being used in the mid-1800's. Today, barbed wire remains the most popular livestock fencing because of its availability and affordability.

Barbed wire is relatively affordable to install yourself or have installed, due to the materials required. Most barbed wire fences consist of only wooden posts with wire ran in between. Standard barbed wire fencing usually has the posts spaced 5 to 6 feet apart, and 3 to 5 strands of wire ran between. The galvanized wire come in three categories: classes I, II, and III. Class I has the thinnest coating and shortest life expectancy. Class I wires will begin to show rust after around 8 to 10 years, while Class III won't until around 15 to 20 years. Aluminum coated wiring is sometimes used and yields a longer life.

 

There are many options to string a barbed wire fence, including:

Hand-Knotting:   Wire is wrapped around corner posts and knotted by hand. This is the most common method.

Crimp Sleeves:   Wire is wrapped around corner posts and bound to incoming wire with metal sleeves, that are then crimped using lock cutters. This method should be avoided because the sleeves tend to slip when under tension. This method is best used for repairs in the middle of the fence line.

Wire Vise:   Wire is passed through a hole drilled into the post, and is anchored onto the far side.

Wire Wrap:   Wire is wrapped around a corner post, and wrapped onto a helical wire, which wraps onto an incoming wire. Friction holds the wire into place.

 

While affordable, barbed wire fencing requires a high amount of upkeep. It is also dangerous to most livestock, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses, and calves. It is only recommended for use with fully-grown cattle, and even then, is seen as a controversial form of fencing. This is due in part to the fact that it is dangerous for wildlife. Low flying birds or bats can have their wings ripped by the top wire, and many are too high or not visible for deer, moose,  or anther animals to clear while jumping. They may get tangled in the wire and give themselves fatal energy, or die a slow death if they can not escape.

How Can I Get Barbed Wire Without Injuring Animals?

If you're dead set on a barbed wire fence, or can't afford another type of agricultural fence, there are a few ways to make your barbed wire fence safer to your livestock and wildlife. You can use small PVC pipes along the top wire of the fence to help aid in the fences visibility, and use smooth wire as the bottom wire so that animals crawling underneath don't become injured.

 

If you're not sure which fence type will be the best option for both your needs and the surrounding environment, visit our Fencing With Wildlife In Mind article.

 

Does Oviedo Require a Permit to Build a Fence?

Does Oviedo require a permit to build a fence?

Yes. Yes! Yes!!  When building a fence within the city limits of Oviedo, or any Central Florida municipality,  that fence must be permitted. Don’t let anyone or any company in Oviedo convince you otherwise.  In fact, if a fence company tells you that you don’t need a permit, run fast and don’t look back. Chances are the fence company or individual is not licensed and insured, and the fence they install for you will not meet local building codes.

 

What happens if you build a fence without a permit?

 

  1. First, permits are a great way to ensure that the work completed was done correctly, and is completed to building code. Think of it as a form of consumer protection. Permits will need to pass an inspection with code enforcement in order to be closed.
  2. Secondly, unpermitted work can affect your homeowner’s insurance coverage in addition to causing very costly issues if you decide to sell your home.
  3. Last, you can be fined by the city, then have to purchase a permit and pass an inspection. Your inspection may fail, resulting in you needing to complete the project again.

 

If you are still thinking that you don’t need a fence permit, think twice. When you try to pull that fence permit, a city permit technician will utter words such as:

 

  • Historic District
  • Special District
  • Signed and Stamped Architectural Drawing
  • Planned Develop Agreement
  • Pool Code
  • Double Frontage Lot
  • Front Yard Set Back
  • Reverse Corner
  • Right-A-Way
  • Maximize Height Limits
  • Urban Design
  • Department of Transportation
  • Visibility Triangle
  • Corner Clip
  • Administrative Modification
  • Variance and much more…..

 

This is why it’s important to hire professionals who understand permitting and your municipality’s building codes.

 

So yes!!! You do need a fence permit!  Visit the City of Oviedo website and find out more:  https://www.cityofoviedo.net/478/Building-Permits   When in doubt call Paramount Fencing or visit them on the web at www.paramountfencing1.com 

 

ALL MUNICIPALITIES IN CENTRAL FLORIDA AREA REQUIRE FENCE PERMITS, EVEN IF YOU ARE ONLY REPLACING. THE ONLY EXCEPTIONS ARE CITY OF ORLANDO AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT HAVE A POOL, AND UNINCORPORATED LAKE COUNTY OR SEMINOLE COUNTY WHO DO NOT REQUIRE FENCE PERMITS FOR CHAIN LINK OR FIELD FENCE.

Responsible Oviedo Fence Company Doing Their Part…

Fence, Vegetation, and Visibility Oviedo.

Anyone that commutes on 426 from Oviedo to Geneva or Geneva to Oviedo knows how dangerous that commute can be.   Last Tuesday there was a terrible accident at Walsh and 426 around 7:40 AM.    The road was shut down.   Anyone who passed the aftermath once the road re-opened probably cringed.

The simple fact is this accident was avoidable.   The line of sight for commuters turning off of Walsh on to 426 was blocked by overgrown vegetation which prevented Northbound traffic from knowing someone was turning southbound.   Couple that with the fact the only passing lanes on 426 as you travel Northbound out of Oviedo starts within 500 feet of the intersection of Walsh Street and 426, an impatient motorist, disaster was inevitable.

The vegetation was part of the Problem.   So we at Paramount Fencing solved that part of the problem.   We contacted the property owner, and with their permission and full cooperation, have removed all vegetation which prevents northbound traffic from knowing a car is turning off of Walsh on to 426 at no charge.    If you know of a similar problem on 426, contact us, and we will remove that vegetation free of charge.

In the meantime,  here is where we need your help.   We need the people to contact District Two Seminole County Commissioner and request that the passing lanes on 426 before and after Walsh Street be eliminated.   We know it sucks, but there are no passing lanes on State Road 46 between Geneva and Oviedo on SR 426 with the exceptions of Walsh, Murphy, and Marsh Streets.    All of these passing lanes are within 500 feet of those intersections.  Understand, these once dirt roads are now paved and are popular short cuts.

Contact Information

Please send e-mail to gvenn@seminolecountyfl.gov
Phone: (407) 665-7205
Fax: (407) 665-7958
Board of County Commissioners
Seminole County Services Building
1101 E. First Street
Sanford, FL 32771

We are asking for your help because one of the vehicles has a mom and three kids involved.   Next, the local bus stop for Geneva Elementry is located where the two cars came to rest.   Understand, the buss normally picks those kids up at 7:45 AM.   Just a reminder the accident happened at 7:40 A.M.  This could have been much worse.

Thanks for your help, Oviedo and Geneva.  Lets drive save. Lets Fence Safe..

Kip HudaKoz- President and Founder Paramount Fencing, Inc.

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